Welcome to Jesuit High School!

My Jesuit education at Jesuit High School in Sacramento left a profound impression on me. I was introduced to the concepts of Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam, Jesuit charism, Christian service, a deep sense of community and camaraderie, a strong Jesuit pride and Catholic identity, a concern for the poor and marginalized, and a belief that there was something bigger than ourselves that we should all be pursuing as Men and Women for Others. Perhaps the biggest lesson that I learned is that a Jesuit education, one founded in the comprehensive formation of the mind, body, heart and soul, changes lives. It is the opportunity of a lifetime.

Jesuit High School is the only Jesuit secondary school in the state of Oregon and was established in 1956 by the Society of Jesus. We are a Catholic, college-preparatory, coeducational school for students grade 9 through 12 that provides a comprehensive, transformative education.

Our goal is to produce graduates who exemplify The Profile of the Jesuit High School Graduate at Graduation: young men and women who are open to growth, intellectually competent, loving, religious, and committed to doing justice. Our goal is to form our students into leaders who are “Men and Women for Others” in their communities and in the world.

I am deeply grateful to partner with our community to advance the mission of Jesuit High School and to be part of the remarkable educational legacy that began with St. Ignatius almost 500 years ago and has grown today to nearly 800 Jesuit schools serving approximately 800,000 fortunate students across the globe.

Again, welcome to Jesuit.

Thomas D. Arndorfer
President

LEARN MORE ABOUT JHS

OUR MISSION

Jesuit High School is a Catholic, college-preparatory school in the Jesuit tradition. It serves students of all religious faiths.

Jesuit education fosters the harmonious development of the adolescent's gifts: spiritual, religious, intellectual, physical, emotional, and aesthetic. Jesuit High School hopes to accomplish this development by demonstrating a personal concern for individuals, a special concern for the poor, an articulate wisdom, enthusiasm, and a sense of community. In so doing, the school hopes to graduate leaders who are committed to serve God and their fellow men and women. Our hope is that our students develop a profound sense of justice founded in love, i.e., leaders who are "men and women for others."

WHAT IS A JESUIT EDUCATION?

FAST FACTS

KEEPING OUR STUDENTS SAFE

Jesuit High School is committed to maintaining a safe-school environment for all of our students. We regularly take proactive steps to protect our students in order to guard their safety and well-being. These include mandatory background checks of employees and the enactment of a Youth Protection Policy. All faculty, staff, coaches and priests who work at Jesuit complete a program which trains us to recognize and prevent abuse of children. Volunteers and part-time staff who have any contact with students are required to complete this training as well.

Jesuit High School does not tolerate discrimination, harassment, abuse, or power-based personal violence. As mandatory reporters, any school employee who knows or suspects that a student has been subjected to abuse is required to inform appropriate authorities.

Each school year, we educate students regarding the reporting of power-based personal violence and harm, encouraging them that if they "see something, say something." We offer programs such as Green Dot to teach students to combat power-based personal violence, including sexual assault, dating violence, and bullying.

Each student is assigned to a trained JHS counselor, to whom they can confidentially report abuse or any other concern. We publicize a state hotline which students can call to report abuse, bullying, or other types of harm in a confidential, anonymous fashion.

At Jesuit High School, we continually seek to implement effective, research-based programs to protect our students, and we insist that students and staff treat one another not only with respect, but as holy beings made in God’s image.